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How do I begin or discontinue water service?
How do I request a drinking water quality test?
How do I report a Water/Sewer Main Break?
How do I report High or Low Water Pressure?
How do I report a Water Leak?
How do I report a Leaking/Damaged Fire Hydrant?
What are the Tap fees for the City of Franklin?
Why do Water Management Employees open fire hydrants?
Why does water need to be disinfected?
Why is the water brown?
Will brown water make me sick?
How long will it take for brown water to clear up?
Is the Water Department doing anything about brown water?
Why does the water sometimes taste or smell bad?
Is the Water Management Department doing anything about bad tasting or smelling water?
Is bad tasting or smelling water safe to drink?
How long will the bad test or smell last?
Why does the water look milky?
What is this pink residue in my bathroom?
How do I get rid of the pink residue in my bathroom?
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Q: How do I begin or discontinue water service?
A:
To begin receiving water service; or to turn off existing service please call Utility Billing at (615) 794-4572. Our hours are 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Monday through Friday, with the exception of Holidays.

Please give us at least 24 hour notice for service requests. Requests for service changes received after 3:30 PM will be handled the next business day.


Q: How do I request a drinking water quality test?
A:
Contact our Service and Repair Department at (615) 794-4554 from the hours of 7 AM to 4 PM with the exception of Holidays. They will take all of the information from you and create a service order. You may also fill out an online Service Request form on our website at any time.
Q: How do I report a Water/Sewer Main Break?
A:
Contact our Service and Repair Department at (615) 794-4554 from the hours of 7 AM to 4 PM with the exception of Holidays. They will take all of the information from you and create a service order. You may also fill out an online Service Request form on our website at any time.
Q: How do I report High or Low Water Pressure?
A:
Contact our Service and Repair Department at (615) 794-4554 from the hours of 7 AM to 4 PM with the exception of Holidays. They will take all of the information from you and create a service order. You may also fill out an online Service Request form on our website at any time.
Q: How do I report a Water Leak?
A:
Contact our Service and Repair Department at (615) 794-4554 from the hours of 7 AM to 4 PM with the exception of Holidays. They will take all of the information from you and create a service order. You may also fill out an online Service Request form on our website at any time.
Q: How do I report a Leaking/Damaged Fire Hydrant?
A:
Contact our Service and Repair Department at (615) 794-4554 from the hours of 7 AM to 4 PM with the exception of Holidays. They will take all of the information from you and create a service order. You may also fill out an online Service Request form on our website at any time.
Q: What are the Tap fees for the City of Franklin?
A:
Tap fees are charged for new service to tie onto the water/sewer system. Contact the Engineering Department to initiate engineering reviews. Please visit our web site at www.franklin-gov.com for all Water/Sewer Department fees.
Q: Why do Water Management Employees open fire hydrants?
A:
We conduct regular water system flushing to remove any mineral build-up and sediment from the pipes and also to ensure that water circulates adequately throughout the system. Fire hydrants may also be opened to conduct fire-flow capability tests.
Q: Why does water need to be disinfected?
A:
Disinfectants are required because they prevent the spread of germs that cause diseases. Before the use of disinfectants, diseases such as Cholera, Typhoid Fever and Dysentery were common. The disinfecting of water has vastly improved the quality of our drinking water. This process may cause your water to sometimes have the taste or smell of Chlorine. You can reduce the Chlorine taste or smell by putting your drinking water in the refrigerator. As a water customer, you can also do your part to contribute to a healthier water and sewer system. Do not dispose of chemicals of any kind down the drains in your home. Together we can make the City of Franklin a better and healthier place for our environment.
Q: Why is the water brown?
A:
Your water is brown due to tiny rust particles made of iron. Under normal conditions, these particles lie undisturbed on the bottom of the pipes. When a disturbance occurs such as a water pipe break, it causes the water in the pipes to flow much faster than normal, which in turn, causes rust particles, dirt and possibly sand to be picked up off the bottom of the pipe and carried into the water. This can happen due to a broken water main, a fire in the neighborhood, or anything that causes the water in the pipes to move faster.
Q: Will brown water make me sick?
A:
We have never found any harmful bacteria in rusty water but we recommend that you don't drink it until it becomes clear again. You can determine this by filling a clean glass with the water and placing it on a white piece of paper. Let the water sit for approximately 5 minutes and then check to see if you find any particles at the bottom of the glass. If you are uncertain about whether the water is safe to drink, we can do a Water Quality test for you. You may contact us at (615) 794-4554 between the hours of 7 AM and 4 PM Monday through Friday with the exception of Holidays.
Q: How long will it take for brown water to clear up?
A:
This is hard to tell, each situation is different. Normally, the water will clear up in four to eight hours. You can help by flushing your commode every half hour or so until it runs clear. Please try not to use your hot water until the water clears, this will keep sediment out of your water heater.
Q: Is the Water Department doing anything about brown water?
A:
Yes. As soon as the Water Management Department is notified of rusty water in the City lines, crews begin locating the source of the problem and correcting it. Remember that it usually takes four to eight hours for the water to clear. This time frame is due to natural forces beyond the Water Management Department's control. When we become aware of a major disturbance in the water lines, the media are notified through a press release which carries the warning of possible rusty water in certain areas. There are times, however, when the Water Management Department is not aware of the disturbance or of rusty water problems until customers report it. The Department still notifies the media in such cases, but the notification is after the fact.
Q: Why does the water sometimes taste or smell bad?
A:
Occasionally, customers of the City of Franklin’s Water Management Department may notice a difference in the taste or smell of their drinking water. Bad tasting or smelling water is most often caused by an excessive growth of algae in the City's reservoirs. These algae give off certain natural substances that cause the water to taste or smell different than you are used to.
Q: Is the Water Management Department doing anything about bad tasting or smelling water?
A:
Yes. When changes occur, we adjust our treatment processes to try and reduce the tastes and odors as much as possible. Unfortunately, most of these natural substances are difficult to remove from water using the current treatment methods.
Q: Is bad tasting or smelling water safe to drink?
A:
Yes. Neither the odor nor the taste pose a health threat. The algae produce compounds which are offensive, but are not harmful to the general public.
Q: How long will the bad test or smell last?
A:
It's hard to tell, every situation is different. Our lakes are natural systems that respond to changes in the environment. Some of these changes such as temperature and storm water runoff are beyond our control and can cause excessive algae growth in our reservoirs. Although difficult to predict, it can take as long as a month for the water to return to normal.
Q: Why does the water look milky?
A:
Occasionally your water may look milky or cloudy. Milky looking water is usually the result of air bubbles in the water. These bubbles are so small (almost invisible to the naked eye) they look like someone poured milk in your water. Once the air in the water dissipates the water will clear. Is the Water Management Department doing anything about this? Unfortunately, we cannot control the amount of air nor the temperature. This problem can last until the water warms back. It is not harmful to the general public.
Q: What is this pink residue in my bathroom?
A:
Pink residue is generally not a problem with water quality. This pink residue is a result of airborne bacteria which produce a pinkish or dark gray film on regularly moist surfaces, which may include toilet bowls, showerheads, sink drains, animal dishes and tiles. If the pink residue appears in your pet's water bowl, this poses no apparent harm to the pet and is easily cleaned off. Many experts agree that the bacteria that causes these pink stains is most likely Serratia marcescens, a bacteria which is found naturally in soil, food, and in animals. The pinkish film often appears during or after construction or remodeling, when dust and dirt containing Serratia bacteria are stirred up. This bacteria is present in a number of environments and wind can carry the airborne bacteria or stir up dust in which the bacteria is present. The use of activated carbon filters, which remove chlorine from the water, can make the problem worse. The absence of normal levels of chlorine in tap water allows Serratia to thrive.
Q: How do I get rid of the pink residue in my bathroom?
A:
The best solution to this problem is to continually clean the involved surfaces to keep them free from bacteria. Compounds containing chlorine work best, but keep in mind that abrasive cleaners may scratch fixtures, making them more susceptible to bacterial growth. Chlorine bleach can be used periodically to disinfect the toilet and help to eliminate the occurrence of the pink residue. By keeping bathtubs and sinks wiped down and dry, the formation of pink residue can be minimized or possibly even eliminated.
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